Are All Welcome?

On Saturday 21st February, Changing Attitude Scotland is holding a Eucharist for Change where we will pray for LGBT inclusion and justice in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

Frankly, at the moment it doesn’t feel as if all are welcome in this Church. A sign hangs outside every Scottish Episcopal Church in the land that proclaims, “The Scottish Episcopal Church Welcomes You” — and I’m not sure that it does. In the wider sense of Church, this is become a Church that I don’t much like and that I don’t recognise.

A church cannot be sometimes inclusive and sometimes not. A church either welcomes people who are LGBT every week, or it doesn’t at all. It speaks up for justice issues whenever it sees injustice, or it doesn’t at all. It models diversity all the time, or it doesn’t at all. It recognises the relationships of same-sex couples within its congregation publicly and proudly, or it might as well not bother recognising them at all.

If you want to do justice, do it in the boring and the ordinary and the everyday.

I stayed at St Mary’s Cathedral because the day I came here as a visitor was the same day as two of our congregation had their civil partnership blessed, and their relationship was prayed for in the intercessions as if to do so were no big thing. By treating it as the most ordinary thing in the world, it was the most extraordinary thing I had ever heard in a church.

But it can also be important to do something a little out of the ordinary, and I think that time is now.

I feel as if we need praying for.

I feel that as we come up on the season of Diocesan Synods and the preparations for General Synod that go along with that, we need to pray for change and the will to make it happen. I feel that as we still struggle with the hurtful and harmful things that have been said by the Church this year, we need to pray for those who have been most badly damaged by it. I feel when I look at the hierarchy of the Church that we need desperately to pray for the wisdom and courage that often feels lacking from those who lead us.

This is LGBT History Month, and that’s significant — not only to pray in thanksgiving for those who came before us and got us to where we are now, but to pray for ourselves and for our place in our own history and for what we might do to change the world.

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. Hear, hear, Beth. The Church in Wales is going through a ‘consultation process’ at the present time and next Monday I shall be at our Archdeaconry Synod, armed with a better than expected briefing paper. We shall see what transpires, but I fear a lack of openness to change among many. :(

Leave A Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s